Characteristics of the Gifted


I received my Mensa Research Journal in the mail yesterday, and found some of the material so interesting that I decided to suspend my writing about the psyche for a day and blog about intelligence, instead.

This issue is about high intelligence (giftedness) in the workplace. I found one article, “Gifted Adults in Work,” by Noks Nauta and Frans Corten, especially interesting. The abstract begins, “gifted adults ( people with a very high intelligence; 2% of the population) sometimes are not able to function adequately at work” (49). Ironic, isn’t it, that the most intelligent among us may function inadequately at work, in school, or in other settings? Why is that?

Gifted people share certain characteristics that can make adapting difficult when adapting means thinking, acting, or feeling within normal limits. Several articles mentioned that people with very high IQs are often misdiagnosed as having ADHD or autism.

Some of the shared characteristics of the gifted are:
  • Speed of thinking. Gifted individuals think more quickly than others. They make many mental switches, associate rapidly, and give the impression that they jump from one subject to the next.
  • High sensitivity.People with high intelligence are also more sensitive in various areas, such as psychomotor, sensorial, intellectual, imaginative, and emotional. They are sometimes confused with people who have ADHD.
  • Introversion.The inner world of the gifted is very well-developed. They are quickly and easily hurt, and so tend to keep others at a distance. Some avoid parties and other social gatherings because the topics of conversation bore them or because they have been rejected for being “different” in the past. People with high IQs also have trouble finding others who are like them, which can lead them to become even more isolated.
  • Emotional development.Many gifted individuals feel emotions strongly; but because their thinking ability is dominant and provides safety, their emotional development may lag behind. They may have trouble linking feelings and reason. This may be reinforced when the child’s giftedness is not recognized from an early age, and when it is mistaken for autism or other developmental problems.
  • Creativity. Gifted people are more global by nature and have strong capacities for imagination. People of average intelligence can’t follow the train of thought of the gifted. Gifted individuals can also identify patterns quickly and thus predict trends. They may draw conclusions intuitively or make what appear to be quick or premature judgments. Their creativity is often frustrated by the regular education system or the typical work place.
  • Independence. Gifted people make judgments and form opinions autonomously. They are non-conformist and therefore display “inappropriate behavior” in the classroom or work place. They often have an aversion to non-democratic authority.
  • Perfectionism. Perfectionism is often accompanied by having too high expectations of others, but also with shame, guilt feelings, and feelings of inferiority through not being able to meet their own high expectations.
  • Learning style. Many gifted people have exploratory learning styles. They look for what isn’t there, and are often bored by rote learning methods. As a result, they may never develop learning strategies.
  • Fear of failure and under-performing.If their intelligence is not stimulated, children often develop bad working habits. They sometimes think that they are stupid, become afraid of failure, and start under-performing. Their motivation to learn decreases.
A Young Scholar, by Jean-Honore Fragonard (c. 1775)

A Variety of Interests and Abilities

Gifted people tend to be interested in and good at many different things. A gifted child may want to become involved in new activities quickly, and then over-commit himself. This may continue into adulthood, making the gifted adult a “Jack of all trades, master of none.”

I found this list of characteristics of the gifted interesting, because they are all too familiar. I think that being able to see layer upon layer of meaning in a situation or relationship can be particularly painful to the person with high intelligence, because often these layers are missed by the average person. This hyper-sensitivity can be crippling and can, I think, cause those with high intelligence to teeter on the edge of neurosis if they aren’t helped to see that they do, in fact, see and experience life differently than the average person. A 10-year-old able to think, read, and comprehend at the high school level, but still emotionally and developmentally every bit the 10-year-old is going to have problems in 5th grade. This is a fact of life that the parents of the gifted child really ought to pay attention to rather than pretending it isn’t there, or expecting the child to work it out on his or her own.

Strategies for the Gifted

The authors write that gifted people use various strategies to cope with their oddness. They may choose to be inconspicuous, keeping a low profile and restricting personal development because they’re not aware of their high intelligence, or don’t care to do the work that will lead to being accepted or better adjusted. (What’s the value of being well adjusted? If you can’t explain it to your gifted child in dollars and cents, he just may decide to forego “getting along” becaues it doesn’t make sense.)

Others may have grown up knowing they were intelligent, accepted it, and developed the social skills to get along with others. Many who adapt do so because they are able to work or learn in a gifted environment. Still others move on from acceptance to being primarily social, functioning well in multi-disciplinary jobs where high intelligence and good social skills are needed (many more highly intelligent people work in the humanities, for example).

Others with high intelligence get stuck using confrontational or isolationist strategies and manage to make lifestyles of arguing with and confronting others in the environment, or of isolating themselves. While this may keep them feeling lively for awhile, it can also be isolating and lead to job terminations, setting the individual up for a long string of losses. I have had a couple of sons who began to develop this pattern in school, and I showed them how getting along with the teacher, even if he was wrong, would earn a better grade than showing the class what a fool the instructor was. Earn the grade first, I told them; educate the teacher afterward. This is a strategy that has worked for them, for the most part, and improved their GPAs. I will add, though, that some fools who are also professors can’t be gotten by, and the high-IQ student may just have to take a few bad grades. “Suck it up,” I tell them, “but don’t compromise your values.”

Professions

Another article in the journal showed what sorts of professions the gifted tend to choose by surveying groups of gifted and non-gifted adults. I was surprised to learn that 45.6% of gifted people surveyed worked in the humanities, while only 17.8% of those with average intelligence did, and that only 22% of the gifted worked in science and technology, while almost 26% of people with average intelligence did. A similar proportion of gifted and non-gifted worked in the natural sciences.

Perhaps most surprising was that only 11% of gifted people chose economic or legal professions, while almost 27% of the non-gifted went into economics or law. This must explain why it’s so difficult to find a good attorney, why smart people often have to do the work their attorneys ought to be doing, and why the economy is in so much trouble.

Finally, no gifted people in the study group chose artistic professions, whereas 4.4% of the non-gifted did. I found this particularly interesting, since in our local Mensa group there are several artists; but not one of them chose art as a primary career. All of them had one or two careers before retiring, and only turned to art after they had retired comfortably. This goes along with what other researchers have found, which is that people who are intelligent and will act on their intelligence also tend to be practical. They will choose certain safety over behaviors have questionable outcomes. My friends who became artists late in life all have that in common. They assumed when they were younger and raising children that their art could not support them, so they waited until they were past retirement age to throw themselves into their art.

Disclaimer

I should note that the study group used in the article about professions was small, and I do not think representative of the general population. I’m sure that there are probably quite a few artists, attorneys, and judges out there with IQs higher than 100.


86 responses to “Characteristics of the Gifted”

  1. Eve Avatar

    Chase, true. And why do you feel like a feather on the surface of the ocean?

  2. chasing the deck Avatar
    chasing the deck

    Unfortunatly choices made by the parents of gifted children often determine how that child will develop. I feel like a feather on the surface of the ocean.

  3. Caroline Avatar

    “…….I’m going through a bit of a crisis in my third half of life, and part of the crisis is that I can’t stand being around very many normal people. I thought I might solve my problem by trying to get more abnormal people in my life………..”.

    I can ABSOLUTELY relate to that!!!

    But anyone reading your summation of Mensa’s findings should read it with caution, since I, who definitely am NOT gifted, have many of the characteristics described in your posting!!!

    I wonder, though, whether being “gifted” is always synonymous with being “intelligent”, in the sense of having a very high IQ.

    I believe that to be accepted into law school, or medical school, you have to have a very high IQ, and therefore be very “intelligent”.

    But I have come across many lawyers and many doctors, who, while they may be excellent at finding loopholes in the law, or diagnosing a disease, would seem to be stupid, insensitive, intellectually incurious, and altogether unintelligent in the areas of life outside their professions.

  4. lemonytree Avatar
    lemonytree

    thank you…that was the idea, to feel refreshed by a thought. Am happy the name did strike a chord.
    Count me a fan of “The 3rd Eva”…a squeeze of tangy lemon for you.

  5. Eve Avatar

    David, interesting perspective. It certainly is a possible explanation for the lack of artists in this particular study. Plenty of bright people I know think–no, know!–that they are right all the time. Even when they’re wrong; so yes, I think having to deal with criticism and rejection well would be required.

    Thanks for visiting. Oh–and I’ll bet someone doing a study somewhere could support your theory! 😉

  6. davidrochester Avatar

    Hmmmmm. Interesting.

    I have an entirely unsupportable theory about why the “gifted” (God, I hate that word) test group had no members who were professional artists.

    Being a successful professional artist requires a huge and healthy ego, or at the very least, an ability to deal with continual criticism and rejection. Most people I know who are exceptionally intelligent do not have either of those qualities, thanks to having been persecuted and ostracized as children.

    Therefore, while I think that all highly intelligent people are also creative, I think they are far more likely to be “closet” creatives, and to pursue art as an avocation rather than as a profession.

  7. Eve Avatar

    Polemique, thank you for your comments. I am just reporting what I read in the Mensa research journal; you’ll have to read the article and disagree with the researchers.

    I think the author/researchers were on to something. Most of us have probably met an intelligent person who just didn’t fit in, and couldn’t seem to fit in. It’s a problem for them in school and in the workplace. I was glad to read that people were paying attention to this as a problem, even if it’s not a problem for most gifted people.

    I do agree with you that many intelligent folk also have high emotional intelligence. One would think that the two would go together; in my own life they have, and in the life of the other high IQ folks I know, it’s worked that way also. So I basically agree with you. However, stereotypes exist because people who fit them exist–that’s what I think.

    1. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I was always under the impression from what I observed of other students throughout my school years, was that all the “intelligent” students were the popular ones, I don’t know if this is just a college-academic and arts/football town thing. This made me feel even more stupid. I couldn’t figure out how to be normal and not weird.
      My husband upset me a little yesterday, he said he is weird. I never thought so, people like him. He is fun and funny, tells great stories too.

    2. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I was always under the impression from what I observed of other students throughout my school years, was that all the “intelligent” students were the popular ones, I don’t know if this is just a college-academic and arts/football town thing. This made me feel even more stupid. I couldn’t figure out how to be normal and not weird.
      My husband upset me a little yesterday, he said he is weird. I never thought so, people like him. He is fun and funny, tells great stories too.

  8. Polémique Avatar
    Polémique

    I found your article interesting, but I disagree with a few points: High emotional intelligence (high EQ) is closely linked with a high IQ; many children who are highly gifted have an extraordinary sense for justice and integrate quite well into school dynamics. I believe that it is predominantly boys who can behave in an aggressive manner when they are bored because they aren’t enough intellectually challenged and many of the characteristics you described depict underachievers and not the gifted “norm.” Same with introversion. Many of these claims reinforce the stereotype from the “Tate ‘Wunderkind”‘ movie, where the main character – a little boy – was so gifted that he couldn’t make any friends; of course, he looked pale and sad throughout the movie until he made friend with the other ubersmart outcasts.

  9. Eve Avatar

    Alida, I home schooled our bright but odd kids until they were old enough to hold their own, which age was different depending on the child. I am quite sure that my now 16-year-old would have been diagnosed as having ADHD, though he did not and does not have ADHD, because there is not an acceptable gifted and talented program in our local schools. Finally, some good private schools opened up in our community and he did very well in 9th grade. This coming year he’ll be attending 10th grade in a traditional, private, all-day school (Catholic, actually) and my husband and I are thrilled for him. Sitting in the orientation meetings and hearing the other parents and students speak about the school nearly made us cry with relief.

    I’m glad we waited; it was worth it. It has given our kids what they needed. I take it a year at a time and watch them carefully to see that their actual selves are being fed, along with the rest.

    Hopefully you’ll find ways that work for your kids according to their needs and talents, etc. Putting one’s child into someone else’s hands for five or six hours a day is a big decision that others seem to make easily. I understand why, but it still makes me feel so odd sometimes.

    About everyone being on something… yes, that’s the way of psychiatry and psychotropic medication these days. Some day I will write myself exhausted about what I really think about that, but will have to wait until I’m finished with whatever I’m writing about now. Suffice to say I believe you and don’t want my kids to join the ranks of the zombified.

    1. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I am excited to say that I will be joining the homeschooling group this year! I never thought I would want to because I am so impatient… But the freedom is so enticing. I am angry at the govt. school system for treating me like they literally own me and my son and I want out!! So, I’m getting out. He did have a very productive school year last year and I’m very proud of him. God gave him some wonderful teachers that kept him working and gave him so much encouragement.

      I have been on adderal and also on a new one can’t remember the name. I really liked them but, seeing that they would eventually make me look older than I am and mess with my teeth and other things I quit taking it. Couldn’t sleep anyway. I know I’ll never put my son on those drugs. I wasn’t zombified and it gave me energy to get things done and helped me focus. I was also taking an antidepressant that is also used for smoking cessation Welbutrin, it gets rid of all cravings ( I really really like it), raised my libido which I haven’t had much of one since I got married (depression maybe?), but along with those and more focus, I lost my spontaninaity (sp. forgot), sense of humor and creativity. I wonder if that stuff just suppresses your right brain so your left brain takes over?

    2. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I am excited to say that I will be joining the homeschooling group this year! I never thought I would want to because I am so impatient… But the freedom is so enticing. I am angry at the govt. school system for treating me like they literally own me and my son and I want out!! So, I’m getting out. He did have a very productive school year last year and I’m very proud of him. God gave him some wonderful teachers that kept him working and gave him so much encouragement.

      I have been on adderal and also on a new one can’t remember the name. I really liked them but, seeing that they would eventually make me look older than I am and mess with my teeth and other things I quit taking it. Couldn’t sleep anyway. I know I’ll never put my son on those drugs. I wasn’t zombified and it gave me energy to get things done and helped me focus. I was also taking an antidepressant that is also used for smoking cessation Welbutrin, it gets rid of all cravings ( I really really like it), raised my libido which I haven’t had much of one since I got married (depression maybe?), but along with those and more focus, I lost my spontaninaity (sp. forgot), sense of humor and creativity. I wonder if that stuff just suppresses your right brain so your left brain takes over?

    3. Noelle Avatar
      Noelle

      So, how did your son do at the private school? My son started kindergarten this year, I am convinced that he is gifted, the school and catholic family services are telling me adhd, without doing any kind of tests or ruling out anything else. After reading blogs and articles like this, I know I have to do everything I can to allow him to be himself. I thank you for sharing this information.

  10. Alida Avatar
    Alida

    This has been one of my biggest fears about putting Luke in school. He is social and well-adapted but he is very sensitive and into things that are way beyond what kids his age are into. He seems to have more in common with 9 and 10 year old. My fear is that he’ll be “diagnosed” with something or other. It’s big business here in Oregon. Everyone is on something. (Adults and children alike) I’m generalizing, but not exaggerating.

  11. Eve Avatar

    Lemonytree, what a refreshing name you have! 🙂
    Welcome to Third Eve, and thank you for your enthusiasm. I’m intrigued by “lemonytree.” I’ve had a lemon tree before, and when you rubbed the leaf it smelled so good. There’s a happy memory in there.

    Anyway, yes it’s ironic, isn’t it, that gifted people often do not go into gifted professions. The humanities must be bursting at the seams with geniuses doing what? Writing literary criticism? Teaching history? Having book clubs?

    Blogging?

    1. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I Love that name Lemonytree!
      Me and my son were both a few years ago diagnosed with ADD. The man who gave me the test thought I was an interesting subject.
      Anyway, I grew up being told that I was “dumb as a doornail” and if I “had half a brain, you’d be dangerous”, basically Stupid. I was treated as stupid in public schools (put in LD lab) which held me back so badly in math I don’t wish to ever catch up. I was good in everything else but felt like a failure where it “counted”…
      Everything my parents wanted me to be interested in I hated.
      I’ve only recently within a few years ago, stopped feeling so stupid, but every once in a while it rears its ugly head and I feel worthless.
      My son has a hard time sitting still in class but all his teachers say he is so smart. He is just like me in school, can’t pay attention, doesn’t feel like the teacher talking about a lesson has anything to do with him and tunes out. I did a lot of that in school. My favourite thing to do was correct a teacher though, and I did any chance I could… esp. in highschool english. Funny, never could get a hang over those “trees”! what’s the point! If you can’t make a sentence in the first place what’s a tree going to do for you? I think I failed that part of class, I really don’t remember. I know I usually did well in english but when it came to my other studies, the tests were not my strong point. The end of the year test for 12th I did so bad I started crying. I remember these questions at the end of the test… they seem like questions an employer would ask, they seemed like “there is no wrong answer” so I answered them honestly… I think that was a big mistake.
      Don’t you have to have a good memory to be gifted? I’m pretty forgetful, always losing things, forgot what I ate already…
      I think I fit ADD really well, most everything on the check list fits me. I did really well on the patterns test which surprised the tester and I did really bad on the “what’s missing” test, where they show you a picture and anything could be missing. The first several pics I got were easy ie. a pitcher of tea, but then it got to a farm scene and I could not find it at all.
      I want to know what you think about it all.

    2. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I Love that name Lemonytree!
      Me and my son were both a few years ago diagnosed with ADD. The man who gave me the test thought I was an interesting subject.
      Anyway, I grew up being told that I was “dumb as a doornail” and if I “had half a brain, you’d be dangerous”, basically Stupid. I was treated as stupid in public schools (put in LD lab) which held me back so badly in math I don’t wish to ever catch up. I was good in everything else but felt like a failure where it “counted”…
      Everything my parents wanted me to be interested in I hated.
      I’ve only recently within a few years ago, stopped feeling so stupid, but every once in a while it rears its ugly head and I feel worthless.
      My son has a hard time sitting still in class but all his teachers say he is so smart. He is just like me in school, can’t pay attention, doesn’t feel like the teacher talking about a lesson has anything to do with him and tunes out. I did a lot of that in school. My favourite thing to do was correct a teacher though, and I did any chance I could… esp. in highschool english. Funny, never could get a hang over those “trees”! what’s the point! If you can’t make a sentence in the first place what’s a tree going to do for you? I think I failed that part of class, I really don’t remember. I know I usually did well in english but when it came to my other studies, the tests were not my strong point. The end of the year test for 12th I did so bad I started crying. I remember these questions at the end of the test… they seem like questions an employer would ask, they seemed like “there is no wrong answer” so I answered them honestly… I think that was a big mistake.
      Don’t you have to have a good memory to be gifted? I’m pretty forgetful, always losing things, forgot what I ate already…
      I think I fit ADD really well, most everything on the check list fits me. I did really well on the patterns test which surprised the tester and I did really bad on the “what’s missing” test, where they show you a picture and anything could be missing. The first several pics I got were easy ie. a pitcher of tea, but then it got to a farm scene and I could not find it at all.
      I want to know what you think about it all.

  12. Eve Avatar

    Helen, I think the sample was small and we could probably just agree that people with high IQs choose the arts as professions, too. In the particular group of people studied in the report, there just happened to be no artists.

    I’d hazard a guess that many of the poets you know are gifted, but are diagnosed as bipolar. Don’t even get me started on psychiatry and diagnosing people til we are blue in the face. I have some strong opinions based on much research I’ve read, just one more reason I no longer work as a therapist.

    But I’m rambling now. 🙂

  13. helenl Avatar

    Hi Eve, I don’t know my IQ and don’t want to. I’m definitely an over-achiever. I have a son who’s gifted and another who’s not. The one who’s not is happier and more stable. My husband’s probably gifted but doesn’t know it.

    I was interested in the low number of gifted people who chose artistic professions. Many of the poets I know are bi-polar not gifted. I’m too well balanced to be a poet. It takes squinting in the fog to create the moment for me. My gifted son failed as a professional musician. Refused to learn to read music.

    1. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I never made it to pro. now that you say your son refused to learn what I assume is sheet music, I can completely understand why. I cannot do the math. I get the notes and I feel the rhythm but don’t ask me to do the math.

      1. trobairitz Avatar
        trobairitz

        thats so interesting what you all are talking about regarding music career fruition.
        i Loved piano when i was young and quite good, but i would get So frustrated with the Time it took to learn to read the sheet music…i didnt understand why i couldnt just learn by ear (which i mostly did), but my teacher became quite good at testing me to see if i was playing by ear or by reading…
        i got frustrated and stopped after a few years.

    2. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I never made it to pro. now that you say your son refused to learn what I assume is sheet music, I can completely understand why. I cannot do the math. I get the notes and I feel the rhythm but don’t ask me to do the math.

  14. renaissanceguy Avatar
    renaissanceguy

    Wow! I saw myself in many of the characteristics listed. I have a daughter in the same boat. I’m actually glad to be able to help her understand herself and to develop coping strategies.

    I believe that I am among those who “. . .have grown up knowing they were intelligent, accepted it, and developed the social skills to get along with others.”

    The two things I have struggled with the most have been Perfectionism and Fear of Failure. It drove me to complete frustration and even to attempting suicide. I now have those two things under control, although they are often somewhere nearby, trying to sneak back in.

    I can see why some of us are thought to have Learning Disabilities. I used to score low in reading comprehension, although I understood what I read much better than any of my classmates. The problem was that I made so many associations and also interpreted the reading selections in various creative ways, that I often picked the “wrong” answer. I finally learned to play the game and pick the “right” answer.

  15. lemonytree Avatar
    lemonytree

    Very intresting …gifted people staying away from creative work. There seems to be a story here, either in analysis of gifted people or understanding creativity.
    Thank you Eva, for such a wonderful blog!!! Kudos.

  16. Eve Avatar

    Douglas, hello, and right you are. That’s what I said–small sample size. But still interesting.

  17. Douglas Eby Avatar

    High sensitivity also has emotional aspects, which can make working in “typical” corporate environments difficult for many of us. As for the finding “no gifted people in the study group chose artistic professions” – that is very strange, and may be a result of the sample size, design of questions, criteria for “artistic profession” etc – since many gifted people do choose creative work.

    1. BARBWIRED Avatar
      BARBWIRED

      Very intetesting about lack of creative types/professions. i am not of Mensa calibre, but above average. recently met a man who i consider a.’creative genius’ . i am an out-box-thinker, but his mind cayn go to dimensions i never dreamed of! Very contagious,which is wondetful! if anyone knows of info/books on thecreative type, pleaselet me know.

  18. henitsirk Avatar

    I believe you! I guess I just always looked at it as just another clique, only this time it’s the smart people not the (necessarily) good-looking or cool or rich people. But like any other group, it depends on who’s there and how you click with them.

    Of course, if you really want abnormal people, just join the SCA 🙂

  19. Eve Avatar
    Eve

    Why do I value being a Mensa member? Hmm, good question. I recently renewed my membership, which had been lapsed for over 10 years (which puts “value” in some kind of perspective).

    My answer today is that I enjoy their publications, and I enjoy the local Mensans I’ve met. As I may have mentioned on the blog now and then (if I haven’t deleted them all), I’m going through a bit of a crisis in my third half of life, and part of the crisis is that I can’t stand being around very many normal people. I thought I might solve my problem by trying to get more abnormal people in my life.

    I have to admit this has helped. So, to answer the question, I value being a Mensa member because I meet so many abnormal people there. It feels like home.

    (Yes, I’m chuckling. But I’m also serious! Really!)

  20. henitsirk Avatar

    I can relate to the part about being a Jack of All Trades, Master of None. A friend once told me I was like a wader, not a diver!

    I’d like to hear why you value being a Mensa member.

    1. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I’m like that too. Could never seriously become fully interested in any one subject that would get me a well paying career. I was a violinist for many years and had potential of being great (not famous great, but really good) I put all my effort and time into practicing. That’s all gone now, thanks to a private school with a non ambitious band (baby music shall we say…) I’m not saying we played out of tune, just the music would take you absolutely nowhere and I started playing Oboe as well. But, nothing ever came of any of it.
      Now I have my interests but they only extend to as far as what I want to know and leave out the useless (imo). Once it gets boring, I’m gone off to another subject.

      1. Toooob Avatar
        Toooob

        Hi there, I just did the personality test which I discovered I was type INFP and following the various threads on the subject, pertaining to these personality types described, it’s seems subjective because as a child, I was found to be in the top 1% iq range. Even now, still meet the criteria & I think perpetuating the ideology that personality equates to intellect is a misguided fallacy, although I am not at all declaring the system is entirely inaccurate given the studies results, it holds some factual truths it’s disseminated in a very general way. But I am disagreeing with the labels that seem to identify intelligence and I do this in high regard to the history of my life and believe that there is more to it that this.

    2. Hind's Feet in High Places Avatar
      Hind's Feet in High Places

      I’m like that too. Could never seriously become fully interested in any one subject that would get me a well paying career. I was a violinist for many years and had potential of being great (not famous great, but really good) I put all my effort and time into practicing. That’s all gone now, thanks to a private school with a non ambitious band (baby music shall we say…) I’m not saying we played out of tune, just the music would take you absolutely nowhere and I started playing Oboe as well. But, nothing ever came of any of it.
      Now I have my interests but they only extend to as far as what I want to know and leave out the useless (imo). Once it gets boring, I’m gone off to another subject.

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